Save the Dates! August 8-11: Giglio Society of East Harlem’s “2013 Festa di Giglio di Sant’Antonio”

Festa di Giglio of EH-2013

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Festa di Giglio of East Harlem

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An East Harlem Scene from “The Godfather”: Sonny Corleone(James Caan) beats up his brother-in-law Carlo(Gianni Russo.)

The Godfather Movie:Click on this link to view YouTube video-  Sonny Corleone(James Caan) beats up his brother-in-law Carlo(Gianni Russo.)

In this scene from The Godfather, James Caan seeks revenge for the unmerciful beating of his pregnant sister, Connie Rizzi. He heads for East Harlem’s E. 118th Street, to brutally beat up his wife-beating brother-in-law Carlo Rizzi(played by Gianni Russo.)

The scene was filmed on the 500 block of East 118th Street. My family and I lived there before this movie was filmed. The stoop that Carlo(wearing an orange and tan suit) is standing on-before he attempts to run from crazed Sonny, is 503 East 118th Street.

 Note of Trivia: Most of the principal photography took place from March 29, 1971 to August 6, 1971, although a scene with Pacino and Keaton was shot in the autumn. There were a total of 77 days of shooting, fewer than the 83 for which the production had budgeted. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Godfather#Production)

This particular scene was filmed in the summer of 1971.(My educated guess, based on the filming timeline, and the fact that the children are being soaked by the “johnny pump.”) Ahun 18 Gianni Russo503 E. 118 The Godfather


An Italian Harlem Notable: Anthony Ravielli- Renowned Illustrator.

Anthony (Tony) Ravielli (1 Jul 1916–9 Jan 1997) was born in Italian Harlem. He attended the Textile High School, taught himself anatomy by volunteering at the Bellvue Hospital morgue, and later studied at the Cooper Union and Art Students League. He began his career as a portrait painter, went into advertising, and by the early 1950s had become an author and freelance illustrator. By this time he had mastered what would become his signature medium–the scratchboard (or scraperboard, if your British). His spare, elegant, and remarkably accurate illustrations still stand today as some of the best examples of the medium.

ImageBut Ravielli would be forever linked with golf, a sport especially in need of instruction. In 1957 Hogan approached Ravielli to illustrate a five part series titled the “The Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf.” The result, which was quickly turned into a book, would become, perhaps, the most important book on golf instruction ever written. Despite 50 years of changes to the game it is still in print, and still a bestseller.

Ben Hogan


Everyday Life in the Hood: Camilo Jose Vergara New York 1970-1973

Camilo Jose Vergara’s photojournalistic approach to chronicling East Harlem/Spanish Harlem.


Long gone, but not forgotten…Morrone’s Bakery.

Long gone, but not forgotten...Morrone's Bakery.

Morrone Bakery was located at 324 East 116th Street in East Harlem. It was renowned for it’s delicious variety of Italian, French and Semolina bread. I once bought a loaf of olive bread, and, believe me,  it was fabulous!
Gabriele and Rosa Morrone opened the bakery in 1965, and until August 19th 2007, they made traditional Italian hand-made breads. This small, neighborhood “mom and pop” bakery, offered an inviting atmosphere, with Rosa Morrone still behind the counter, selling the breads herself. My great Aunt Columbia Altieri was friends with Rosa. I remember her telling me that the bakery was going to close. Very sad indeed!

Copy and paste the link below, to read a New York Times article, from September of 2007, discussing Morrone’s Bakery closing.  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/18/nyregion/18bakery.html


STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face of New York

Signed copies now available!STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face of New YorkSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New YorkSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: ZIG ZAG RecordsSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: VESUVIO BakerySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: SUBWAY INN
STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: ALBANESE Meats & PoultrySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: RALPH'S Discount CitySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: M & G DINERSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: MANHATTAN FURRIERSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: LONG ISLAND RestaurantSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: REYNOLD'S Bar
STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: ITALIAN AMERICAN GROCERYSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: IDEAL HosierySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: DITMAS Kosher Meats & PoultrySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: KATY'S Candy StoreSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: IDEAL DinettesSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: D. D'AURIA and Sons Pork Store
STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: CIRCO'S Pastry ShopSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: CHEYENNE DinerSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: CAFFE CAPRISTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: BRAND'S LiquorsSTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: ASCIONE'S PharmacySTORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face Of New York: PUBLIC Fish Market

STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face of New York, a set by James and Karla Murray Photography on Flickr.

Can you spot the East Harlem storefronts?(Albeit long gone.) Bet some of you can! Have fun!