Holy Rosary Church New York City’s photostream

Chapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is Blessed
Chapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is Blessed
Chapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedChapel Tabernacle Is BlessedHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the Lord
Handmaids of the LordHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the LordHandmaids of the Lord

Holy Rosary Church New York City’s photostream on Flickr.

Holy Rosary, located at 444 East 119th Street in East Harlem, was my family’s parish church from 1950-1967. I stumbled upon their flickr photostream today, and thought I should share it with my readers. When my older sisters were active with the CYO, they often spoke about Father Bob. Does anyone remember him? I think I have a photo of him somewhere in my archives.


Stanley Kubrick’s Photos of New York Life in the 40s

TwistedSifter

Self portrait with showgirl Rosemary Williams 1948 – Photograph via VandM.com

 

 
Stanley Kubrick—who wrote and directed Lolita, Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange and The Shining—was one of America’s most influential filmmakers. Directors ranging from the Coen Brothers to Tim Burton paid visual homage to his works in their own films, and no less than Steven Spielberg said: “Nobody could shoot a picture better in history.”

In fact Kubrick’s special skill behind the camera and his ability to create visual intrigue were evident long before he was a Hollywood icon. Even at the age of 17, Kubrick was an immense talent. In 1945, for $25, he sold a photograph to Look magazine of a broken-hearted newsvendor reacting to the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. A few months later Kubrick joined Look’s staff to become the youngest staff photographer in the magazine’s history. He continued…

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